NSN

Nokia Solutions and Networks

Looking ahead to 5G
Building a virtual zero latency gigabit experience

FutureWorks
NSN White Paper
December 2013

1. Three key development areas in 5G

The continuing growth in demand from subscribers for better mobile
broadband experiences is encouraging the industry to look ahead at
how networks can be readied to meet future extreme capacity and
performance demands. Nokia Solutions and Networks (NSN), along
with other industry partners, believes that communications beyond
2020 will involve a combination of existing and evolving systems, like
LTE-Advanced and Wi-Fi, coupled with new, revolutionary technologies
designed to meet new requirements, such as virtually zero latency to
support tactile Internet, machine control or augmented reality.

5G will be the set of technical components and systems needed to
handle these requirements and overcome the limits of current systems.

Stretching targets for 5G beyond 2020

Fig. 1. Existing mobile technologies will not be able to provide the capabilities to meet market demands
beyond 2020. Sustained research will be needed to create a high performance 5G environment.
Limits will be reached.
Current systems do not
scale to requirements
beyond 2020.

Unlike 2G, 3G and 4G, it is unlikely that 5G will be a single new Radio
Access Technology (RAT) nor will it replace macro cells. It will be a
combination of existing RATs in both licensed and unlicensed bands,
plus one or more novel RATs optimized for specific deployments,
scenarios and use cases. In particular, NSN has identified the need for
a new RAT for ultra-dense deployments, with the aim of providing a
virtual zero latency gigabit experience.

NSN is already undertaking extensive research to map out the scope
of 5G and has a clear vision of the three key pillars that will make this
future network a reality.

More spectrum must be pressed into service

More radio spectrum for mobile networks is vital to meet the
increased capacity and coverage demand. New spectrum will need to
be allocated and put into use quickly. Without sufficient spectrum,
communities beyond the reach of wired broadband will miss out on
the benefits of future services and entire countries could lose ground.
The amount of spectrum available needs to be expanded by adopting
new frequency bands and by using available spectrum more efficiently,
both in terms of frequency and with regard to when and where it is
employed.

Networks will become much denser with many more cells

The second pillar of 5G will be to use many more base stations,
deployed in a heterogeneous network (HetNet), combining macro sites
with smaller base stations and using a range of radio technologies.
These will include LTE-A, Wi-Fi and any future 5G technologies,
integrated flexibly in any combination.

Raising the overall performance of networks

The third major goal will be to get the best possible network
performance by evolving existing radio access technologies and
building new 5G wireless access technologies. For example, it is
generally accepted that latency must decrease in line with rising
data rates.

Sustained research and development in these three areas will be
necessary to create a 5G environment that can meet market demands
such as 10,000 times more traffic, virtually zero latency and a much
more diverse range of applications. What’s more, all this must be
achieved at an affordable cost to enable operators to maintain and
improve their profitability.

The NSN vision is that: “5G will enable a scalable service experience
anytime and everywhere and where people and machines obtain
virtual zero latency and gigabit experience where it matters”.

Let’s now look at each of the three development areas in more detail.

 

For the complete White Paper, click below:

http://nsn.com/sites/default/files/document/nsn_5g_white_paper.pdf

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